Monday, May 21, 2012

When dreams come true

I use to be in the business of making dreams come true for some very sick but very amazing children and as a side gig for funsies and some extra cash I was a birthday party fairy. I learned many things from these two vocations. Things like there is such thing as Jedi training Camp, You can meet Lightening McQueen and little girls can scream  in a way that needs to be studied by audiologists due to its incomprehensible decibel level when they find a real like fairy standing in their living room.

But the one thing I took away from both of those experiences was the importance of having a dream and doing what you can to see if come true. I experienced children coming into our office and telling us about wanting to meet Spiderman, Dora the Explorer and Batman. I learned about swimming with Dolphins, Manatees and princess make-overs. These wonderful, amazing and very sick children dreamed. They taught me I needed to make my dreams happen before it was to late.

My parents wanted to have well-rounded cultured children. So in between the stitches, imaginary friends and sibling rivalry they would make sure we got a healthy does of museums, art galleries and open air concerts. I attended my first Shakespeare in the park at the age of 4 years old. They took us to see The Tempest. Apparently I was riveted. My brother, he doodled on a notepad. Shakespeare in the park became a summer tradition. I even made John go to a Shakespeare in the Park production of Othello a few years ago at the same park I saw The Tempest in.

Another attempt to make sure my brother and I weren't complete Cretans was the introduction to classical music. My brother played the violin. I played the piano. There was much excitement surrounding school trips to the Symphony. Group tickets were bought through my piano teacher for classical music performances at the University. Usually taking place on Sundays and usually I fell asleep. Eventually after I received my own CD player for Christmas one year my parents gave me a CD called "Mr. Bach Comes to Call." It was a story and classical music. Mr. Bach visits a little girl who is practicing the piano but would rather be playing with her friends. Mr. Bach and his choir invade her living room and play all sorts of music and tell her his life story. I'm not sure why a dead composer appeared in a suburban living room but he did and I loved the CD. It's was one of many in a series. I had many of them. I listened to them each night as I fell asleep. I can still name pieces of music and tell the story associate with the piece based solely on those CDs.

My favourite though was the one about Vivaldi. It was a mystery. It was about a missing violin and a missing little girl who is found. It took place in Venice. Epicness. I LOVED that one. There was gondolas, mystery, intrigue, an island with graves, a mysterious prince, a broken violin. All with Vivaldi being played in the background or being worked into the story. In my bedroom I dreamed of going to Venice. Of seeing canals and the grand square. It all seemed so romantic. Way more awesome than Paris. Paris didn't have a bridge of Sighs! Venice did! Venice was where it was at for me.

Wednesday morning I get on a train and head to Venice. There is a 10 year old girl inside of me who is screaming so loud she will probably pass out due to lack of oxygen because an 18 year old dream is coming true. There is also a real life 28 year old girl who is going to get the first hug from her parents in almost a year and can guarantee a few tears.

Epicness. Pin It Now!

3 comments:

  1. My first cassette tape was Tchaikovsky'a greatest hits. I read A Midsummer Nights Dream when I was 10 and then read all of them. Your parents sound awesome!

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  2. That is pretty cool! I have had a lifelong obsession with Vivaldi's music. He was an extraordinary composer. Have a great time with your family!

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  3. Those last couple of paragraphs made my eyes glisten. Have the time of your life! And DOUBLE YAY FOR MOM & DAD HUGS!

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